Serial #41538

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Model: 000-45
Built: 1930
Entry Date: 01-01-1971
Source: Owner
Contributor: Eric Schoenberg
Comments:
   Editors Note: The following comments were made by Eric Schoenberg a one time owner of this guitar and extremely well known in acoustic guitar circles. Eric is also the owner of Schoenberg guitars (http://www.om28.com/) a well known guitar store. Eric also worked with Martin to produce guitars under the Schoenberg name and has accomplished many other things over the years. The Stan referenced in this quote is Stan Jay, owner of Mandolin Brothers the store that had this guitar for sale as of November 2009. The text from the Mandolin Brothers entry is included inthe Nov 19 2009 entry for this instrument.
   "That guitar was a major portion of my life for a while. And, typical of my life at the time, it was a complicated relationship. Its sound was so deep, so immense that I could hardly play it. The notes were so full that I couldn't bring myself to stop them, or to not get lost in them. Therefore I could play slow tunes fine, like Talk About Suffering, on my first solo record. I'm not sure how much I used it on the New Ragtime Guitar. Probably most tunes were on my '56 D-21 which was my main instrument for so many years. Still, I loved that old 000-45 deeply (in retrospect). In those days, the thought that one used a particular guitar for a particular type of music was unheard of. In fact, I believe it's still wrong to categorize types of guitars like that. I suspect that the concept of smaller bodies and wider necks were for fingerstyle might have originated from my big mouth - at the time I was making that point into a vacuum - a black hole. It was unheard of, or better yet, un-thought of. I'd been fighting the D-21 for so long, though it was a super guitar. One summer I gave it to Marc Silber to take across the country to John Lundberg for the otherwise unknown processes of neck reset (the California reset) and brace shaving. It came back a totally different instrument. When I found the 000-45 - I bought it from George Gruhn for $800 - it opened a new world. Finding an OM was the next step that solved all the problems; not so damn intense sounding, perfect neck width and 14 frets, which was essential for playing the rags."
   "I must say, Stan's prose sounds kind of out of place, especially since I was so intricately involved with that guitar. My feelings about the 'originality' factor, that it seems misplaced these days, also stems from that guitar. It was so amazing and lovely, and its non-originality issues affected it, its sound, and my attachment to it not one iota. It was kind of a mess when I got it, as you can imagine from George's price. Fixing it was quite a process. The neck was bowed - that's why George sold it so inexpensively - no one knew how to fix it. On Marc Silber's advice (he was a major influence, both musically and instrumentally) I took it to Martin- I was friendly with folks there at the time, primarily Les Davidson, and they were particularly helpful, let me visit it a couple times, etc. When I got it back, Matt Umanov kept it for a couple days trying to figure out how they did it. He discovered where they had removed the fingerboard and put a shim into the curve, then reset the neck, the proper way. At the time they weren't owning up to the possibility of resetting necks, probably because so many were needed, and at that time, no one else knew about taking the neck out. Matty also gave me original inlays that he had gotten from a retired old-time Martin employee and put them in. Here, Stan's comment about sloppy inlaying doesn't make sense - the original inlaying was never clean - that's a thing of the present. The guitar came with awful tuners. Martin plugged the holes and put on modern Waverlies - the original ones, which were something like $6 a set. The late Mike Katz, a good friend, found original tuners, the ones that Stan found in the case pocket. The plugged holes in the peghead were enormous, and nowhere near the place of the originals. Nowadays some would point to them and scream, but as I said before, they didn't detract one iota to me. In a way, they improved the feeling of the guitar-just another part of its fascinating (to me, at least) story, spec
   "I could go on and on about this guitar, would love to get to see it, wish I could afford to buy it back, but better stop while I'm ahead, I hope."

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Model: 000-45
Built: 1930
Entry Date: 11-15-2009
Source: Elderly
Contributor: Marshall Newman(email)
Comments:
   Ex Eric Schoenberg, on cover of New Ragtime Guitar Album
   Price:: $65,000

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Model: 000-45
Built: 1930
Entry Date: 11-19-2009
Source: Mandolin Brothers
Contributor: elephantfan85
Comments:
   Vendor URL:: http://www.mandoweb.com
   "41538, having the Adirondack spruce top and the Brazilian rosewood sides and back, with a newer (but still kinda old) black plush lined hard shell case."
   Behold the second most ferry tisirable pearl inlaid guitar on the face of the planet earth, having abalone inlaid on every border, including the sides of the neck heel and the end graft, snowflake and diamond fingerboard inlays. It sports the Adirondack spruce top and the much-craved Brazilian rosewood sides and back. Its hard shell case, which shows normal signs of wear, is not recently made . it might from the 1950s, and is black Tolex-covered with the green racing green plush lining."
   "'.Just how rare is it?' I thought I heard some one say. Martin made 1 in 1906, and then between 1911 and 1931 they made 141 more. 142 guitars, then, is all Martin made of the 12-fret persuasion within the prewar era of recorded serial numbers including the 21 made in 1930. They did, however, make 123 fourteen-fret 000-45s between 1934 and 1942 in which final year war requirements curtailed guitar production. The original 000-45 price in 1930 was $170 but don.t feel bad that you didn.t buy it back then, because that didn.t include the hard shell case. In order to afford a Style -45 in 1930 you had to be fabulously rich and remember, this was during the first full year of the Great Depression, a time nothing at all like we're in now."
   "In the case pocket are found a prior bone saddle and some early era, nicely made Waverly brand tuners with floral engraving and ivoroid buttons, from the period when Waverly was located in New York . the underside of each tuner plate reads .Product & Process Patents Applied For, Waverly Musical Products Co. Inc, New York.). Extremely fine Irving Sloane (unbelievably beautiful) three-on-an-engraved plate side-mounted tuners with ivoroid buttons presently inhabit its headstock; the bridge is a replacement, ebony, pyramid style. The guitar shows normal wear including on the treble side above the bridge, scrapes, scratches and dings . both under and over the finish. The guitar has been either oversprayed heavily or possibly, in some areas, refinished. The .C F Martin. impressed logo on back of the headstock is largely obliterated by layers of lacquer. The fingerboard has been replaced and the fingerboard inlays, similar to the originals, are not as cleanly inlaid as the factory would have done it. The instrument has two or maybe three short and inconsequential hairline cracks on the treble side. The headstock is bordered in crè and black with ivoroid outstanding, the neck in single ply, the heel cap and end piece in grained ivoroid (the latter mitered in abalone), it has a diamond dart behind the nut, square slots, a generous fingerboard width at nut of 1 7/8. and an unusually wide bridge string spacing of 2 7/16ths (please let me know if you find any modern guitars with this wide a bridge spacing). The fingerboard inlays are brilliantly reflective and captivatingly colorful, are initially all snowflakes or etched diamonds when they occupy every other fret from #1 to #9 and then every third fret to the cats-eye at 15 and then another cats-eye at 17.""
   "Our head of repair, Leroy Aiello, will, later this summer, early this fall, be performing the full Vulcan Intervention - a neck reset, and a resetting of the original bar frets along with necessary lifting, re-rounding and leveling. Leroy.s work is the closest thing we know to .the hand of John D.Angelico.. Sometimes we think that our head of repair, who was not exactly born in 1964 when John D.Died, (but close), seems to be channeling the illustrious builder. When a guitar comes up after four months under the touch of the master.s glove, it has the vim and vigor of a 9-year-old. You would never know it.s a 79-year-old. No way."
   "Fun Facts: And now, some background on this giant, this monolith of American vintage verisimilitude: Even though it is a 12-fret slothead it has, as many do, a 25.4. scale length. It has .C F Martin & Co,. Nazareth, PA. stamped on the back of the headstock and the interior center strip inside. It is made from old growth, quarter-sawn Brazilian rosewood. It has abalone on all a-borders, around the soundhole and on the face contiguous to the fingerboard extension. The headstock is inlaid with the Martin abalone torch. It has multi-colored (intricately) herringbone and colored wood marquetry down the back stripe, an ebony pyramid bridge with an angled saddle, and newer inlaid ebony bridge pins. It has no pickguard . that area, where it probably could have used a pickguard, is worn and then oversprayed. There are some visible screw holes in the headstock where another type of tuner had been installed in the past."
   "Its provenance, as it was told to us by the owner (all of this is hearsay we have no proof): It is said to have been purchased in the mid .60s from George Gruhn (before he had a shop, we presume), and then owned/used by Eric Schoenberg as a recording instrument on several guitar albums in the .70s and .80s. This guitar is said to appear in photos on the front and rear of one of Eric.s solo albums. It was purchased from Eric by the last owner in the early to mid 1980s. It has, through this time of most recent ownership, been serviced only by T. J. Thompson of West Concord, MA and by Leroy Aiello, Mandolin Brothers two of the best in the west . well, actually, the east but .best in the west. rhymes."
   "The areas of touch-up and the signs of normal use and wear notwithstanding, this guitar sings with the voice of the vocally-trained eagle, or perhaps it.s a gryphon, it is the epitome of mellow, smooth, airy and woody . the way only a top of the line prewar Martin can be -- and yet it becomes bold, bedazzling and boisterous when you pick more aggressively. It is, as you would expect, the best of what.s possible in a six-string situation. Modern arbiters of vintage valuation decree that a 1930 000-45 should, today, sell, when solidly excellent, in the range of $90,000 to $105,000. What would you say if we told you that you can obtain this proud beauty, just one step down from .excellent,. for only $67,015 or at our cash discount price $65,000? Did somebody say .718 981-8585?."
   Our Discount Price is $67,015.00 and Our Cash Discount Price is $65,000.00."
   Asking Price: $65,000

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